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DID YOU KNOW?
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200 years of Remington.

In 1858 Beals invented and patented a spur-trigger, single-action, percussion revolver. The unique feature of this pistol was the manner of securing the cylinder pin with the loading lever. This arrangement would have far-reaching implications for Remington’s large-frame revolvers.

Beals would receive at least eight more patents for revolvers and single-shot rifles in the decade that followed, and all of these patents were assigned in whole or in part to the Remingtons.

GAAS-150036-CH2-022

In 1858, Fordyce Beals invented and patented a spur-trigger, single-action percussion revolver. In the decades that followed, all of these patents were assigned in whole or in part to Remington. Top: Remington-Beals Navy Revolver sn. 460 (Charles Schif Collection). Remington-Beals Navy Revolver sn. 2941 (Slim Kohler Collection)

His first successful martial revolver, which came to be known as the Beals’ Navy Revolver, was an excellent firearm. Beals designed a six-shot, .36-caliber, percussion revolver with 7 1/2-inch octagonal barrel and walnut grips. This developmental work occurred in mid and late 1860, with the first models ready for testing in the spring of 1861. The term Navy revolver refers to .36-caliber revolvers, while Army revolver refers to .44-caliber revolvers.

In early 1861, there was little doubt that a major conflict with the southern states was possible. President Lincoln, inaugurated on March 4th, was soon after compelled to use his powers as Commander in Chief to call up 75,000 volunteers to augment his small standing Federal army. This action resulted in a fever of enthusiastic recruiting throughout the North and compelled manufacturers such as Eliphalet Remington to take notice.

remington anniversary

The Army Ordnance Department established an operation in New York City to procure commercial weapons for Federal troops. Major William A. Thornton, commander of Watervliet Arsenal, and Major Peter Hagner, chief of the New York Agency, tested the Beals large-frame martial revolver and wrote letters of commendation to Chief of Ordnance General James W. Ripley. Armed with this correspondence, Samuel Remington journeyed to Washington, D.C. and showed Ordnance officers a Beals Navy Revolver.

Ripley evidently liked what he saw, for he immediately ordered 5,000 Beals revolvers at $15 each; however, these were to be made in .44 Army caliber, not .36 Navy. The official letter order was dated June 13, 1861, and called for these Beals’ Army Revolvers to be delivered “with the greatest possible dispatch.’ Nevertheless, Remington was to deliver a combination of Beals Army and Navy revolvers on this contract.

Workmen at E. Remington & Sons completed the first large-frame Beals Navy Revolvers in June 1861, and these guns had a ready market during the first difficult months of the Civil War when firearms of any sort were scarce.11 Feverish activity gripped Eliphalet and his three sons in Ilion as they procured skilled workmen, ordered raw materials, sought new machinery, and designed tooling to make precision gun parts.

The stress must have been enormous on everyone, especially the proprietor, Eliphalet Remington II. On July 12, 1861, the founder of Remington Arms passed into gunmaking history…

Possibly the finest thing that could be said of Remington was this statement written by Albert N. Russell many years later: In stature he was tall, of muscular build and capable of great endurance. His manners were gentle and kindly, but his resolutions were firm. He was a man of sterling integrity and had the implicit confidence of his employees, who always sought his advice and counsel. I am able to pronounce no greater eulogy upon his character than by saying that during the thirty-six years I have lived in Herkimer County, I have never heard him spoken of except in terms of respect and commendation.

Control over the burgeoning company fell to Eliphalet’s three sons, Philo, Samuel, and Eliphalet III. They proved that they had learned much from their father, and out of respect they retained the company name as it had been for many years. Under the brothers’ management, a gunmaking establishment that had no equal was built over the next twenty years. But it was Beals large-frame revolvers that were needed by Federal officers and cavalrymen alike.

Schuyler, Hartley & Graham, military goods dealers in New York City, were among the first to procure large numbers of these martial revolvers. Other private dealers who procured these guns directly from Remington included Cooper & Pond, Palmer & Batchelders, and Tyler Davidson & Co. Concurrently, the Army Ordnance Department needed as many of these revolvers as possible to arm Federal troops in the Ohio and Mississippi River Valleys.

In all 4,586 Beals Navy revolvers were procured for the Western Theater troops by the Ordnance Department from dealers between August 1861 and May 1862. Between August 1861 and May 1862, E. Remington & Sons sold 7,250 Beals Navy revolvers directly to the War Department for $15 each, and nearly 13,000 Beals Navy revolvers were in Federal service by the summer of 1862. On August 17, 1862, E. Remington & Sons delivered the first 300 Beals Army revolvers to the Army Ordnance Department on the original contract with Ripley. Deliveries continued thereafter.

remington anniversary timelime


 

KNIFE CRIMES IN TORONTO.

Knives used in the commission of crimes over a ten year period, in Toronto Ontario. Stats from thr Toronto Police and Pulse 24.

For the period 1995 to 2005, there were 4,427 knife related incidents, of these 339 resulted in deaths. On average Toronto experiences 443 knife incidents and 36 fatalaties per year.

DID YOU KNOW?

Latin America is murder capital of the world. >>

Mexico and Paraguay top pot producers. >>

Accidental Deaths

700,000 doctors in USA, 120,000 American deaths caused by doctors.

80,000,000 gun owners in USA, 1,500 accidental gun deaths in USA.

FIREARMS RELATED FACTS! 

When to verify a firearm.
  1. When the firearm is transferred.
  2. When the firearm is newly imported.
  3. When the firearm is newly manufactured.
  4. When the classification of the firearm has to change due to a modifaction of the firearm.
  5. Before Registration

Important Changes

On May 20 2004, all transfer and registration fees were eliminated, requiring revision to all registration and transfer  application forms. The following revisied forms came into effect on October 24, 2004.

681: Application to register a firearm acquired by transfer (Restricted and prohibited firearms)

682: Application to register a firearm acquired by transfer (Non restrictedfirearms) and

998: Application to register firearms (for individuals)

AS OF OCTOBER 24, 2004, ALL FIREARMS NEED TO BE VERIFIED BEFORE THEY ARE REGISTERED OR TRANSFERED TO A NEW OWNER.

There are currently 5,500 firearms verifiers across Canada and there are over 1.4 million verified firearms.

The Canadian Firearms Registry is now part of the Canadian Firearms Center(CAFC) and is no longer under the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. The Canadian Firearms Center is part of the Solicitor General of Canada portfolio.

The Chief Firearms Officers (CFOs) in all provinces except Quebec and Ontario assist in maintaining the Verifier's Network in their jurisdiction and also provide training to individuals and Business Verifiers.

Bill C-10A allows for an individual to ship restricted and prohibited handguns, using the most secured method offered by Canada Post. Providing a signature is obtained upo delivery.

Other prohibited firearms may still only be shipped by licensed carriers.Remember that the serial number and the FIN are two different things.

Pay attention all legitimate gun owners

Legitimate gun owners, the easiest targets of all, are within the sights
of police. Will confiscation of their weapons be the next step?

By Mark Bonokoski
Fri, February 17, 2006

At a time when there is a need for a major investigation focusing on the
burglaries of legitimate gun owners - some of these break-ins so
well-cased that they have all the earmarks of an organized breach of the
national gun registry - the OPP has put into motion a plan which focuses
on the easiest targets of all.

They are easy targets because the OPP already know who they are, where they live, and what weapons they have. But they are not criminals.

What they are, instead, are legitimate gun owners - those who obeyed the law and registered their weapons as demanded by gun registry
legislation, despite the suspicions of many that it represented the
first step in the slippery slope towards confiscation.

Registry link to cops

Those suspicions may not be so far-fetched.

Punch a name into a CPIC computer in any police jurisdiction in the
country and, if that person is a legitimate firearm owner, all the
information in the national firearm registry about that person is as
close as the click of a mouse.

In a directive to all OPP detachment commanders, obtained by Tory MP
Garry Breitkreuz, a major thorn in the gun registry's side, provincial
cops were recently provided with a virtual playbook on how to deal with
legitimate gun owners who have not re-registered their weapons within
the allotted time frame following their five-year licence's expiry.

The police will know who these gun owners are because, at the same time the registry is contacting them, it is copying the person's local OPP
detachment.

"Upon receipt of this notice," the directive
says, "the firearms are (to
be considered) UNREGISTERED" - the capitalized emphasis coming from the OPP itself.

And this, as the playbook on procedure outlines, will mean one of two
things happening to the person who receives that notice: Either a phone
call from an OPP officer, or a knock at the door and a cop standing on
their doorstep.

It is a project which will not be without significant manpower,
especially considering that RCMP data indicates there are well over a
half-million registered gun owners in Ontario - all who will be getting
that phone call or that knock on their door if they live within an OPP
jurisdiction.

And here is how it will go down.

"As each new document arrives," says the directive, "the registered
owner can be added to a niche report as a 'newly involved' person."

Then the commanding officer is instructed on what to do next.

"Assign a member (of your force) to this document and owner," it reads.
"This member should contact the owner to let them know that the police
have this notice as well.

"During this contact, if the owner wants to surrender the firearms for
destruction, then make an appointment for the member to go to the home
and pick up the firearms. Have owner sign the quit claim. These firearms
can then be destroyed per police orders and normal destruction policy."

This is not to say, of course, that legitimate gun owners are without
options since federal law allows 30 days to either begin the
re-registration process - for a $60 fee for a long-gun licence, and an
$80 fee for handguns - or to transfer ownership of the weapons to a
"lawfully entitled person."

But, according to the OPP directive already in motion, failure to comply
within the time restraints imposed will result in serious repercussions
- with gun owners who had followed the law by registering
their weapons
now in the position of being looked upon as criminals.

Enforcement action

"If the registry does not see that the (re-application) process has
begun (within the allotted time), there will be further notice to the
local police service notifying them of the possession of unregistered
firearms," reads the directive. "The onus is now placed on the local
police to take some form of enforcement action.

"Please note. AT THIS POINT CRIMINAL POSSESSION HAS BEGUN. Some
enforcement action will now have to be taken locally to obtain the
firearms."

And then the next steps are laid out.

"Knowing the person possesses the unregistered firearms without a
firearms licence, obtain a search warrant under Sec. 487 (of the
Criminal Code) to seize the firearms," the directive orders. "Remember
your contact with the owner previously? That confirmed the location and
existence of the firearms. This meets the Regina vs Hurrell requirements
for the affidavit you file as part of your warrant application.

"It is the discretion of the investigating officer whether a charge is
laid, but the firearms will have to be dealt with according to the law.

"They are illegally possessed, unregistered firearms."

Considering legally registered gun owners are now being this closely
monitored - and stalked if they fail to re-register their weapons by the
book - there is some irony in the fact that the police, regardless of
jurisdiction, are not required to register their guns and the department
of national defence is totally exempt from all registration requirements.

In 2002, 409 firearms were reported either lost or stolen from the
Canadian military, including 17 sidearms - all Browning 9 mm pistols, a
preferred street piece.

A year earlier, the RCMP itself had to confess to 16 handguns being
stolen, and two handguns being lost.

All, of course, are unregistered and therefore untraceable.


. You can call Mark Bonokoski at (416) 947-2445 or e-mail at
mark.bonokoski@tor.sunpub.com

Sixty seven Municipalities in Ontario have approved hunting on Sundays with firearms. need more information? contact me.

Increase in firearms prices. Canada’s new gun control measure.

 

Expect to pay more for your hunting rifle come 07December1st

Your new acquisition will have the letters “CA” stamped somewhere on the firearm, likely the frame or the receiver, maybe the word CANADA.

 

This implementation is tied in to the 2001 United Nations resolution aimed at controlling the illegal trade of firearms worldwide.

Canada as a nation in the UN is one of the countries spearheading this measure and has signed the protocol in 2002 March.

 

This new marking will definitely increase the sale price of firearms. The CFC has indicated that the markings will be kept simple, so that compliance can be relatively easy and at a low cost.

 

Firearms manufacturers in the USA have not revealed any associated increase.

AV  05 11 11

 

ATTENTION FIREARMS OWNERS.

The Canadian Firearms registry is contacting owners of registered

firearms that have expired licences and have not yet renewed. They are

revoking the current Firearm Registration Certificates for those firearms.

The notices you see attached as one example are the documents that are sent to the owner with a copy to the local detachment or municipal police

service. By receipt of the notice, the firearms are now UNREGISTERED.

 

WHAT DO YOU DO: (A suggestion)

 

1] Create a NICHE report similar to the reports created for all RIDE

checks so only one report is referenced for all of these notices. As each

new document arrives, the registered owner can be added as a newly involved person.

 

2] Assign a member to this document and owner. This member should make contact with the owner to let them know the police have this notice as well.

 

3] During this contact, if the owner wants to surrender the firearms

for destruction, then make an appointment for the member to go to the home and pick up the firearms. Have the owner sign a Quit Claim. These firearms can then be destroyed as per Police Orders and normal destruction policy.

 

4] If the owner intends to obtain a licence, which is the ideal

situation envisioned by the Registry, then remind the owner that they have

30 days to begin that process. Note that the Registry is checking regularly

to ascertain if the owner has applied for a current licence. If they see the

application in the CFIS system, they will flag that file to await the issue

of a current licence and then will arrange for proper registration.

 

5] If the owner intends to transfer the firearms to a lawfully

entitled person, then the unlicenced owner also has 30 days to begin that

process. If the transfer process is noted within the CFIS system, the

Registry will complete and register the new owner to the firearms.

 

 6] If the notified owner chooses to dispute the revocation of the FRC,

the must file a request for a Reference Hearing within 30 days. If they do

that, they are entitled to retain possession of the firearms until the

conclusion of the Reference Hearing at which point the court will decide on the validity of the revocation and the disposition of the firearms.

 

7] If after 45-60 days from the service of the notice, the Registry

does not see the application process has begun and there is no request for a Reference Hearing filed, there will be a further notice to the local police

service notifying them of the possession of unregistered firearms. The onus is now placed on the local police to take some form of enforcement action.

 

Please Note: AT THIS POINT CRIMINAL POSSESSION HAS BEGUN. Some

enforcement action will now have to be taken locally to obtain the firearms.

 

] Knowing the person possesses the unregistered firearms without a

firearms licence, obtain a search warrant under sec 487 to seize the

firearms. Remember your contact with the owner previously? That confirmed the location an existence of the firearms. This meets the R. v Hurrell requirements for the affidavit you file as part of the warrant application.

 

2] Once seized, the normal Returns to a Justice will have to be

completed. It is the discretion of the investigating office whether a charge

is laid but the firearms have to be dealt with according to the law. If the

owner now chooses to Quit claim the firearms, then destroy them as the

normal process. It is suggested that at this pointy in the process, it is

too late to now allow the owner to ask for transfer as the owner has had the time to do that and ignored the previous options. They are illegally

possessed, unregistered firearms.

 

Please review the sections of Part III of the Criminal Code pertaining

to firearms, and the possession requirements contained within the Firearms Act.

 

WHAT IS A DEACTIVATED FIREARM?
A permanently deactivated firearm is not a "firearm" as defined by the Criminal Code section 2. It is merely a chunk of scrap metal. No firearms control law, firearm control regulation, or any other firearms control provision applies to it in anyway.
IT IS NOT A FIREARM!

The following was prepared by Larry Whitmore for all firearm owners

CSSA Bulletin August 2004.

 

Registration Cards To Carry or Not To Carry That is the Question.

We have received quite a number of questions about whether you should carry your registration certificates (or cards, as the case may be), while transporting your firearms. Although there are no penalties in the Criminal Code for not having the certificates in your possession, it can cause considerable inconvenience.

Section 117.03 of the Criminal Code states the following:

(1) Notwithstanding section 117.02 a peace office who finds

(a) A person in possession of a firearm who fails, on demand, to produce, for inspection by the peace officer, an authorization or a license under which the person may lawfully possess the firearm and a registration certificate for the firearm, or '

(b) A person in possession of a prohibited weapon, a restricted weapon, a prohibited device or any prohibited" ammunition who fails, on demand, to produce, for inspection by the peace officer, an authorization or a license under which the person may lawfully possess it, may seize the firearm, prohibited weapon, restricted weapon, prohibited device or prohibited ammunition, unless its possession by the person in the circumstances in which it is found is authorized by any provision of the part, or the person is under the direct and immediate supervision 'of another person who may lawfully possess it.

 

(2) Where a person from whom any thing is seized pursuant to subsection (1) claims the thing within fourteen days after the seizure and produces for inspection by the officer by whom it was seized, or any other peace officer having custody of it,

(a) An authorization or a license under which the person is lawfully entitled to possess it, and  (b) in the case of a firearm, a registration certificate for the firearm, the thing shall forthwith be returned to that person. 

 

If you have traveled from Toronto to Thunder Bay to either shoot a match or to hunt, and you cannot produce a registration certificate when requested at a road check, your guns will probably be seized and you have 14 days to travel back to Thunder Bay to get them back, quite an inconvenience.

If you do not return in 14 days to claim your property, guess what? You lose it.

Section 117. 3 go on to state the following:

(2) Where any thing seized pursuant to subsection (1) is not claimed and returned as and when provided by subsection (2), a peace officer shall forthwith take the thing before a provincial court judge, who may, after affording the person from whom it was seized or its owner, if known, an opportunity to establish that the person is lawfully entitled to possess it, declare it to be forfeited to Her Majesty, to be disposed of or otherwise dealt this as the Attorney General directs.

Our recommendation, take a photocopy of all your paperwork and keep it in your gun case. Will a photocopy suffice? Yes. Nowhere does the act state that the original is to be produced. We suggest you keep your plastic firearms license in your wallet and your original registrations and ATTs locked away in a safe place. Carry the photocopies in your gun box and you will avoid any situations if stopped by the police. Just as a caution, if you cannot produce a registration certificate and your gun is seized, the police will check out the status of the firearm to determine if it was ever registered and lay charges immediately if it is not. This is not speculation as this took place on numerous occasions during the recent hunting season. Better safe than sorry.

 

Bill C-10A has been used by our Liberal government to outlaw theuse of "prohibited firearms" of all types other than Firearms Act section 12(6) handguns at any shooting range. They did this by making illegal for a firearms control official to issue a document allowing the holder to take a "prohibited firearm" other than a 12(6) handgun to a shooting range.

In spite of that, we have a report of such a document being issued after section 19 of Bill C-10A came into force. It is not known whether the government is backing down as a result of the unfavorable relations caused by the C-10A changes, or if this was simply an error.

The NFA recommends that owners of FA s. 12(2), 12(3), 12(4) and 12(5) firearms apply, IN WRITING, for ATTs (NOT SAPs) to take their firearms to a shooting range. Applicants should NOT accept refusals over the telephone or by email, as it is a legal requirement that any refusal to issue an ATT MUST be made in writing [FA s. 72(1) and (2)].
The firearms control system is now refusing to issue ATTs or SAPs to allow owners to take a FA s. 12(2), (3), (4) or (5) firearm to a shooting range.

As a countermove, such individuals are applying for ATTs to do just that.
Such an application, of course, must be refused -- but can only be refused using the FA s. 72 to 81 procedure, which is complex and expensive.
That procedure allows the person refused to refer the matter to a provincial court judge for a reference hearing.FA s. 75 says, "On receipt of a reference under section 74, the provinical court judge, SHALL fix a date for the hearing..."
How many reference hearings will the CAFC pay for, do you think?

What Guns Can I bring into Canada Legally
By Elke Mairs
Some Americans do not feel safe unless they carry a firearm or other personal protection, either in their vehicle, or on their person when they are travelling. The laws in the USA allow them to do so as long as they have the appropriate permits for the type of weapon they are carrying.
 
Canadian laws are far more restrictive as they apply to firearms and personal protection devices, and when a person crosses an international border, they are bound by the laws of the country they are visiting. Here are some of the restrictions everybody needs to be aware of.
 
Firearms: Any firearm or weapon brought into Canada must be declared. If a firearm or weapon is not declared, customs will confiscate it and you could face criminal charges. Not all firearms and weapons are allowed into Canada.
 
Travellers can bring a non-restricted firearm , such as a sporting rifle or a shotgun, to Canada for hunting purposes, for use in competitions, as part of an in-transit movement through Canada, or for protection against wildlife in remote areas.
 
The Firearms Act requires every firearm owner in Canada to have a licence or valid Firearms Acquisition Certificate. Visitors who do not have a Canadian Firearms Acquisition Certificate will need to report their firearms to customs at the border, complete a non-resident firearms declaration form in triplicate, have it confirmed by a customs officer and pay a $50 (Canadian) fee. Visitors can import a restricted firearm only to attend an approved shooting competition.
 
Examples of restricted firearms are target pistols and short-barrelled, centre-fire, semi-automatic rifles or shotguns.
Prohibited weapons and firearms have no legitimate recreational use and cannot be imported into Canada. Before you try to import a weapon, please check carefully to make sure it's not prohibited.
 
Personal Protection: Some countries will allow you to carry personal protection devices which are considered to be restricted weapons in Canada and cannot be brought into Canada legally. Examples of these prohibited weapons are knives that open automatically, pepper spray, throwing stars, spiked wristbands, blowguns, brass knuckles, and stun guns. 
 
 
Big Guns - Little Guns - Limitations on bringing handguns and other weapons into Canada
Guns
From Elke Mairs,
  
Limitations on bringing handguns and other weapons into Canada Some countries will allow you to carry personal protection devices that are considered to be restricted weapons here and cannot be brought into Canada legally. Examples of these prohibited weapons are handguns, knives that open automatically, pepper spray, throwing stars, spiked wristbands, blowguns, brass knuckles, and stun guns.
 
Canada has enacted strict laws with respect to the importing, exporting, possession, use, storage, display and transportation of firearms.
 
Since these are federal laws, they apply across the country.
Canadian Firearms Restrictions As of January 1, 2001, the procedures for bringing firearms into Canada, or for borrowing firearms while in Canada, changed as a result of mandatory licence requirements for all firearms owners and users in Canada. Any firearm or weapon brought into Canada must be declared. If a firearm or weapon is not declared, customs will confiscate it and you could face criminal charges. Travellers can bring a non-restricted
firearm, such as a sporting rifle or a shotgun to Canada for hunting purposes, for use in competitions, as part of an in-transit movement through Canada, or for protection against wildlife in remote areas.
 
Visitors who do not have a Canadian firearms licence will need to report their firearms to customs at the border, complete a non-resident firearms declaration form in triplicate, have it confirmed by a customs officer and  pay a $50 (Canadian) fee. To save time at the border, you can download the form and complete it prior to arriving at the border.
 
Don't sign the form until you are in the presence of the Customs officer. Once confirmed, this declaration form will act as a temporary licence and registration certificate while in Canada and is valid for 60 days. You may renew your temporary licence any time during a 12-month period without paying an additional fee. Unlicenced non-residents who plan to borrow a firearm in Canada must obtain a Temporary Borrowing Licence.

You will be able to purchase ammunition with your Canadian firearms licence, a confirmed firearms declaration form or a Temporary Borrowing Licence.
 
Prohibited Weapons in Canada
Prohibited weapons and firearms have no legitimate recreational use and  cannot be imported into Canada. Before you try to import a weapon, please check carefully to make sure it's not prohibited.
Canadian Definition of a Prohibited Firearm
A handgun with a barrel length of 105 mm(4.14 inches) or less, or designed or adapted to discharge a 25 or 32 calibre cartridge (see exceptions below)
A rifle or shotgun that has been changed to make it less than 660 mm (26 inches) in overall length; A rifle or shotgun that has been changed to make it 660 mm (26 inches) or more in overall length, with a barrel less than 457 mm (18 inches) in length;
An automatic firearm or a converted automatic firearm; Any firearm prescribed under the Criminal Code regulations to be prohibited.
 
Exceptions
Visitors can import a restricted firearm only to attend an approved shooting competition. Examples of restricted firearms are target pistols and short-barrelled, centre-fire, semi-automatic rifles or shotguns. Requirements for temporarily importing restricted firearms into Canada. In addition to the non-resident firearms declaration form, before arriving at the border, you must have an Authorization to Transport (ATT) for all restricted firearms (most handguns). The ATT is issued by the Chief Firearms Officers (CFO) of the province(s) where you are taking the firearm.
 
 The CFO will only issue ATTs for approved purposes, such as shooting competitions. You should be aware that concealed handguns are not  permitted in Canada. To apply for an ATT, call 1 800 731 4000 (Canada and U.S.) or 1 506 624 5380 (other countries) and ask to be connected to the CFO(s) of the province(s) that you are visiting or travelling through.
 
Hunters visiting Canada:Take Note
Non-residents should have their hunting licence or receipt from an outfitter as well as proper identification to help them pass through Customs into Canada. Those who do not have such documentation can still come into Canada, but it may take longer to clear Customs.

American hunters should check with U.S. Customs about re-entering their country with firearms after their visit to Canada. It is advisable, however, that they have sufficient identification, such as passport, driver's licence and proof of the reason for their visit to Canada to help them clear American Customs
For direct information if the make and model of your firearm may be imported into Canada, you can write to canadian.firearms@justice.gc.ca or telephone Canadian Firearms Centre 1 800 731 4000 (toll free within Canada or the U.S.)
 
 
 
        
     

EVER WONDERED HOW THE USE OF LEAD BULLETS HARMS THE ENVIORMENT.

NORTH AMERICAN GUN CLUB RANGES ARE MOVING IN THE DIRECTION OF LEAD FREE RANGES, FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT ME. Mail

When shooting during inclement weather, be aware of thre following.

a. Most thunder cannot be heard beyond 10 miles.

b. If you hear thunder, you are already at risk.

c. Lightning can strike as far away as 25 miles from the parent storm.

d. Seek shelter, if flash to bang is 30 seconds or less and stay there for at least 30 minutes after the last flash.

 
THE LONGER FIREARM OWNERS TAKE TO GET ORGANIZED.   THE GOVERNMENT HAS ALL THE OPPORTUNITIES TO MAKE OWENERSHIP MORE DIFFICULT.
 
FIREARMS LICENCE APPLICATIONS FOR INDIVIDUALS.
Since the Possession- Only-Licence is no longer available to new applicants, form JUS888 has been discontinued and has been replaced by two forms:
  • Form CAFC 1038, "Application for a licence under the firearms Act(POL) for individuals aged 18 years and over" is for individuals who are applying to replace a valid Possession Only Licence which is about expire.
  • Form CAFC 1039, "Application for a licence under the firearms Act. (PAL) (for individuals aged 18 years and over) is for individuals who wish to obtain a PAL or to replace a PAL or FAC which is about to expire.
  • Every one with a valid POL, PAL or FAC will be sent a licence application before their licence expires. Individuals may also download a form from the Canadian Firearms Web site.http://www.cfc-cafc.gc.ca or by calling 1-800-731-4000. Forms may be photocopied. 



TRIVA AND NEWS HIGHLIGHTS
 
STATS CANADA REPORT 2004
 
STATS CANADA.
HOMICIDE IN CANADA REPORT FOR 2004 -
Garry Breltkreuz
MP for Yorkton-
PAGE 2: "Canadian police services reported a total of 622
homicides in 2004, (73 more than the previous year.) The
national homicide rate of 1.95 victims per 100,000 population jumped 12%, after reaching its lowest point in more than 30 years in 2003.

PAGE 13 - "In 2004, more than two-thirds (68%) of adults (18 years or older) accused of homicide had a Canadian criminal record. among those adults with a criminal history, 70% had a prior conviction for a violent offence: 8 for homicide."

PAGE 13: "While Aboriginal people account for approximately 3% of the Canadian population, the comprised 17% of victims and 22% of persons accused of committing homicide in 2004."

PAGE 10: "In 2004, almost all categories of family homicide  increased from 2003."

PAGE 14: "Half(49%) homicide incidents in 2004 in which data was available occured during the commission of another offence that led to the homicide.
Of these 232 incidents, the majority (180) were committed as a result of a violent offence: 106 during an assault, 45 during a robbery, 8 during a sexual assault, 5 as a result of stalking, 3 during a kidnapping and 13 other violent offences.
Six other homicide incidents occurred as a result of arson."

PAGE 14: "Among causes  where it was known whether alcohol or drugs were a factor, police reported that the majority of accused (73%) and victims (55%) had consumed an intoxicant at the time of the homicide."

PAGE 14: "Police suspected the presence of a mental or developmental disorder among 14% of the accused persons in 2004, similar to the percentage reported each year since 1997."

PAGE 14: "Data from the Homicide Survey have shown that homicides are often associated with the victim's involvement in illegal activities, such as gang activities, drug dealing or trafficking and prostitution. in 2004, police reported a total of 18 prostitutes killed.
There were another 100 homicides committed against
persons working in other types of illegal "occupations" such as drug dealers, members of an organized crime group or gang, 21 more than in 2003."
 
 

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