Recreational Firearms Shooting. It's one of the SAFEST sports.

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SAFETY! WE ARE RESPONSIBLE
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Canadians who legally own firearms are responsibile for their firearms twenty four hours a day. Remember to excersise all required storage and transportation requirements under the law, it is suggested that you go beyond these requirements. FIREARMS SAFETY IS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY.

Binary explosives are incredibly safe-to-use low explosive mixtures, when they are used correctly.

Unfortunately, even some professionals sometimes forget that while binary explosives are very stable and predictable, they still must be respected as explosives, and that placing them in a such a way that they can create shrapnel is a very bad idea.

The Washington County Sheriff’s office says an instructor conducting firearms training was seriously injured when he was hit by shrapnel after an exploding target went off.

The office said 42-year-old Scott Turner of Albany suffered life-threatening injuries in the accident. He was flown Saturday night to a hospital in Portland.

Turner was leading a group of former military and law enforcement officers in firearms training involving the use of Tannerite. The group had rented a private facility near the rural community of Timber.

The training exercise involved shooting the exploding target. The target was placed behind a car door and when it exploded, shrapnel from the car door hit Turner.

In every single incident we know of where someone was injured using these targets, three things happened.

The first is that the users used a much larger than recommended mixture. Most manufacturers recommend keeping the target mixture down to 1/4-1/2 lbs per target. That hasn’t kept people from making binary mixture targets of hundreds of pounds, and creating massive blasts.

The second is that users are too close to the target when they fire upon it. “Too close” depends upon the size of the charge, but we’d recommend not being inside 100 yards for even the smaller charges, and not being inside 300 yards of you’re going to exceed manufacture guidelines. Most of the serious injuries and near misses we’ve seen have been with large charges, inside 100 yards. Some have been inside 50 yards.

The third is that the charge should never be contained in any sort of a container that could produce shrapnel. We’ve see binary explosives placed inside cars, appliances, and similar metal objects. When you shoot a binary explosive contained in any sort of a metal object, you are creating a shrapnel bomb.

Sadly, Mr. Turner was injured when the binary explosive was placed behind a car door, and the detonation (predictably) created shrapnel, some of which hurt him.

A certain fake Russian Youtube star nearly suffered a similar fate two years ago by violating every possible binary explosive safety rule.

We enjoy the safe use of binary explosives, even larger than recommended mixtures, when they’re done intelligently and from a safe distance.

People can get hurt with even stable, low explosive mixtures if they aren’t careful.

Be safe out there, and if you’re a praying person, I’m sure Mr. Turner and his family would appreciate your prayers.

 
SAFE GUN HANDLING DEPENDS ON NOT JUST LEARNING, BUT SEARING INTO YOUR CONSCIOUSNESS THE VERY IMPORTANT SAFETY RULES.
GOOD shooting is, above all, SAFE shooting. Thanks to Hunter Safety and other firearms training courses, the rate of firearms' accidents has been steadily decreasing, despite much greater levels of firearms ownership and use.
Hunting and competitive shooting are among the safest of participant sports.
Rather than use this excellent record as an excuse for complacency, it should be an incentive for further improvement.  

SOME CLUBS REQUIRE THAT  EVERY NEW MEMBER MUST COMPLETE A CLUB LEVEL SAFETY COURSE, IN ADDITION TO SUPERVISED SHOOTS, BEFORE THEY ARE ALLOWED TO SHOOT UN-SUPERVISED ON THE RANGES. NO ONE IS ALLOWED TO SHOOT ALONE; CLUBS MAKE IT QUITE CLEAR THAT  ANY MEMBER FOUND IN VIOLATION OF THE CLUB'S SAFETY RULES WILL BE SUSPENDED IMMEDIATELY, PENDING REVIEW BY THE SAFETY COMMITTEE.  

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Personal Safety Protection is your responsibility, meaning that you are not only concerned about your protection but you are also responsible for those around you.
You must remember that if you display your concern for protecting your friends on the range, you are also demonstrating one of the fundamental comittment of the shooting sports, SAFETY!  

Undoubtedly the Canadian Firearms Safety Course lays the foundatation for every shooting discipline to build on. It has been well thought out, very well put together and is very easy to understand, it is an excellent teaching aid.
We should all be very proud of it. Over the years a number of reports and statistics have indicated that firearms related recreational sports have one of the lowest percentages of injuries per 100,000 participants, this accomplishment can only be credited to our educational and safety training. We must all try to maintain these standards or do our very best to surpass them. PRACTISE SAFE FIREARMS HANDLING AT ALL TIMES.

Safety encompasses a wide area, some of these require close monitoring: examples are.

 

Safety at home. We are firearms owners, we do have a family, I believe that we have a responsibility to ensure that every member of the household is knowledge in the safe use of firearms and they exercise the respect firearms deserve.

Safety in the field. It is very terrifying to visualize new hunters or new target shooters participating in their sport in isolation (alone) this is potentially a very dangerous undertaking. We should try to establish a buddy system.

Range Safety. Although our primary concern is personal safety, we must be alert and diligent, we must be able to look for potentially unsafe practices and try to correct them in a very amicable manner. We must look out for our fellow competitors and spectators.

Incorrect ammunition. Research indicates that quite a large number of injuries are associated to the wrong use of ammunition. The individual does not spend time to ensure or determine that the ammunition matches the firearm he or she wishes to use. Vigilance and education will help to reduce this problem.

Unsafe transportation of firearms. Some individuals still take their firearms to the range and field wrapped in blankets or stuffed in duffle bags. One individual took his pistol to the range in his pocket. These are definitely unsafe transportation practices and should be discouraged immediately, making sure that the consequences and the danger associated with them are fully understood by the individual.

 

Improper target placement. There is definitely a total disregard as to how and where targets should be placed, what happens if someone shoots at a misplaced target, are they aware of the dangers associated with shooting at one of these. The realities must be imprinted in their minds, we must be able to police and enforce these rules.

Safety in our clubs. It is much more difficult to monitor safety in a multi discipline club than one which has just one discipline. For any club to operate safely it is suggested that a safety committee be established with a very strong and vigilant policing team, this team checks the activities on a regular basis, this team must report to the committee of any unsafe practice and immediate disciplinary action must be taken. We must all realize that these actions are necessary for the shooting sport to be safe and enjoyable.

Personal protection. Many shooters have lost some of their ability to hear and see properly, it has been suggested that eye and hearing check up should be done by a qualified person on a regular basis, and that any short coming should be corrected. The inability to hear or see properly lends to unsafe situations on the range, remember the quality of corrective equipment used by the individual enhances or limits his or her performance.

In conclusion, we must continue to be committed and diligent enough in helping to make the sport of our choice enjoyable and safe.

Author Allman A Vieira 

GUN CLUB SAFETY

By Jack Robertson

(This article is reprinted with permission from the Gun Club Advisor, winter 1993)

At this time of year in a large portion of our country, ice fishing tip-ups are being put away for another season, snowmobiles are being readied for storage and a change of sporting seasons is about to come upon us. Soon the shotguns will come out for spring and summer leagues, handguns for silhouette practice and rifles for bench rest practice. As your members drift back to the range to take up their chosen discipline, one thing must be re-enforced immediately, "RANGE SAFETY."

Before members new and old take to the firing line, safe gun handling must be emphasized right from the beginning. As a range owner or manager it is your responsibility to insist that safe gun handling be a serious part of your range operation.

Safe gun handling can be re-enforced by you or your representative in several ways. Seminars for new shooters explaining in detail range commands, firing line procedures and just plain common sense are one means. Another is the posting of reminder signs in prominent places around your facility. An example is the ATA's signs sent to all it's member clubs "Open or Out." Below are pictured several posters available from NSSF.

In a good many instances newcomers are not the most serious offenders. Often times, the old-timers take gun handling for granted and as a result become the most frequent offenders. This is one area were the old cliché, "familiarity breeds contempt," is quite true. It becomes the responsibility of every shooter on the line to police not only their own actions, but that of their neighbor shooter as well. If done in a polite fashion, any shooter should feel free to point out to another shooter any unsafe firearm practices.

A club or range should be proud of its safety record. Should you have the occasion to have media coverage of an event at your facility it would go a long way to be able to say, "we've had recreational shooting here for years, and have never had a shooting related accident." We know our sport ranks among the safest of all sports and that fact should be brought to the attention of the general public.

This upcoming shooting season, let's see if we can't all work together and make it the safest season ever. With a little bit of effort on everybody's part this can happen. 

KIDS AND HANDGUNS!

IT SEEMS reasonable to assume that at some time a handgun bug will have a golden opportunity to bring together a clean-cut young fellow and a well-kept pistol. Some of us who haven't given this matter quite a lot of thought might be confused by such questions as how to start, when, with what, and where.

 

Let's begin by imagining a young man, married, with a fair amount of plinking and target work under his belt, and a handgun or two of his own. Pretty soon a son appears. Pop has gone his unthinking way; merely keeping his guns locked away from the snoopy fingers that we all have in the house at times. I think he could continue this until his son (or daughter) has reached the age of about four years.

 

This brings up the main point I want to stress in the whole chapter. Let's be frank about it. No matter if you never teach anyone anything else about firearms, please, for the sake of all living things, pound into a beginner's head the fact that he should NEVER un- intentionally point a gun at anything that would be damaged, to his sorrow, if the gun should be fired. Talk about the old-fashioned teacher's hickory stick; in this case you have my permission to use a hammer, if necessary! I don't mean this word-for-word, but I mean it!

 

Can you imagine a call from the Police? "We have your son here. Please come down as soon as possible!" So it turns out to be a shooting-scrape, and after end- less questions your son says, "Dad never taught me anything about guns, and the gang had them.

I think you would sleep pretty damned poorly for a long time after that scene.

 

Now that I've blown the main top, let's get back to the four-year-old stage. It seems that your own guns should still be left out of sight and locked up when they're not being used. Junior is probably running around at full speed and shooting up his playmates with his toy six gun.

 

BUT, let's remember, many gun wise parents won't let their children have anything to do with such toys, except, perhaps, when they are handled with exactly the same care that real guns rate. Such discipline isn't easy to instill and maintain when children are tiny, but it has been done. Such children aren't involved in tragedies with guns that "look like real," and are. Those who are allowed to "quick-draw" and "shoot it out" with each other get so awfully fast that you'd hate to face such speed with a real gun.

 

Maybe they make you think. Anyway, somehow you feel a little older already.

Cheer up. That part will continue as time goes on. But will it hurt if it brings a safe and efficient pistol man into the family? He'd better be safe from the first; so if you put thumbs down on undisciplined play with toy guns, perhaps you're right, and most of the neighbors wrong!

But both of you can play with the rubber-band gun, which fires a projectile and must be handled safely. That will be at home, of course. Soon you both will graduate to an inexpensive air-pistol, accurate enough for fun and some instruction, and the whole family will join in. There's still no noise to disturb neighbors, but eyes and other tender places are danger spots. Junior's "Watch where you point it!" if needed, usually can have been brought to a fine polish by this time. Mean- while, he's developed some trigger-control and become used to a heavier gun than the Bullseye pistol. Watch your own example!

School soon starts to bother the family (or relieve it!), but in a year or two maybe Pop had better let his target pistol show up. Start for the club range early enough so as to let Junior sees the gun before he's pushed off to bed. Why not teach him to check to see if it's unloaded and, some other day, help clean it? (What better gift can you offer him than your time?) Don't go into over-much detail; but let him handle a real gun at home, under supervision. For comparison and instruction, tell him about football, baseball and other sports.

 

Possibly the pistol business should be soft-pedaled for the next few years unless he trends definitely in that direction. "Ramming a pistol down his throat" is a fine way to make him a gun-hater, even if you your- self love them, as no doubt you do.

Who can name an age when these youngsters will get the urge to become seriously acquainted with a handgun? But you can bet it will be before we older folks expect it.

 

If his interest stays high, expose him more and more to your own guns, making sure that they are un- loaded and never pointed where they shouldn't. Dry shooting might be OK, but I can't make myself think that quick-draw should be done in any kid's presence. They see too much of it on the screens. If Dad does it, too, it must be all right, they will think. In his early years the boy thinks Pop is next to God, almost. Later, you must earn his devotion. Halos don't come cheaply.

Sometimes a boy is well into the teens before he shows real interest in guns. It may never come, but if it does, these suggestions based upon my own experience might help.

 

For a beginner I'd pick a lightweight .22, to be fired single-shot until he's used to it. This holds especially for automatics, which reload themselves in a flash, literally, after each shot. A too-heavy gun is discouraging to try to hold at arm's length, even for us older guys who may not be much on the muscle side. Of course grip size must suit the hand. Flinching comes quite surely from an over-heavy caliber. I knew one young lady whom some idiot talked into firing a .45 Auto, and she had never shot a pistol before. She didn't again, for a number of years.

 

Now as to "Where?" Well, few of us would care to fire on a range next to a kid who had had no previous instruction! Let's find a good safe sandbank or steep soft ground for a backstop, out in the country and where the owner allows us. There should be no other people around, no animals and any stones, rocks or metal to cause a ricochet. Those glancing pieces of lead can go almost anywhere.

 

Best start with large targets, close-up, and graduate to quart or smaller tin cans. Your garage-man usually will be glad to get rid of them. When cans begin to feel unsafe under Junior's fire, it's time to start on paper targets, not too small or far away. They show exactly where the hits are, and they make a definite numerical record of progress. A little later the larger guns may appear, if the time seems right.

 

At about this time we should take stock of ourselves. Are we so smart, after all? Lots of us have had, at one time or another, good instruction. But as years passed, we slipped into our own little habits, and scores slipped, too. We had excuses like "Bifocals," "Nervous work at the office," or just plain "Getting older." Maybe we should take the kid to the range and to a really good instructor. Then, the first thing you know, you may be competing against the boy some night and come out feeling worth two bits less than nothing. It's been known, at this stage, for Pop to arrange different shooting dates for himself and the youngster! But you can pat your ego on the back by feeling that you gave him a fine start, anyway. He won't forget it; he'll be grateful.

Not all families will be like the imaginary one used as an example. "Junior" may be a girl, or there might be ten of them, or a variety. "Pop" could be a bachelor who has taken a friend's youngster under his wing. Does it matter?

 

 In closing this chapter I'd suggest that you train just one kid at a time. Usually, after just a little instruction, one youngster will be pretty dependable. But as soon as you get a crowd around to prod him on, he's apt to blow his stack, get careless, and show off a bit. Even adults sometimes give in to such strange impulses.

 

As an add-up, it looks as though you should always set a good example, catch your pupil when he or she; is really interested, start with the proper gun and ammo, finish with competent instruction-your own, sharpened up if need be, will do finely-and then stop worrying about Junior. By then he should be absolutely safe with a gun, and learning marksmanship so fast that, maybe, you'd better slick up your own laurels.

 

Good shooting to both of you! 

UNFAMILIAR GUNS--AND USERS
 
Any complicated or delicate mechanism calls for well-informed care in its use. The Walther P-38 wartime auto could be put together minus its locking assembly, still fire, and let the bolt slam against the stop lugs. This is decidedly unhealthy, and too few of us really know these arms.
A person need not be notoriously careless to (unload) an automatic pistol by removing its magazine and forgetting to eject the cartridge from the chamber.
 
 An individual can empty the barrel first, then pull out the magazine and forget the round he has placed in the chamber. So magazines' safeties that disconnect or bar the trigger mechanism are very good, unless you loose the magazine and go naked before "the  bright face of danger".  In 1947 the little hammerless Colt assumed these disconnectors.  Testing for such safety is simple, with an empty gun: cock it, pull out the mag, and try to snap the hammer.
Users must always know whether or not any gun near us contains a load.
 
At the range we discussed the liability of familiarity breeding carelessness. We think that the experienced, long-time, shooter should ask himself whether this particular hazard applies to him. Certainly it does apply to some.
 
We read too often of accidents incurred while cleaning the gun. The terrible thing is that they can happen as accidents, though sometimes the account is hard to believe in spite of a kindly wish to accept it as truth..
 
Let us all remember, beginer and old hands alike, that every firearm accident, like every shooter's act of vandalism or even of inconsiderate behaviour afield, reflects upon the whole group who use and love GUNS.
 
The shooting games life depends upon public goodwill, doesn't it?  Put that burden of responsibility in your pocket, carry it proudly, and assume your part in spreading the safety message. Believe me your part is important!
 

LET'S TAKE EVERY OPPORTUNITY TO INVITE OUR FRIENDS, NEIGHBOURS, ASSOCIATES AND MORE IMPORTANTLY OUR KIDS, TO SPEND SOME TIME AT THE RANGES, EXPOSE THEM TO FIREARMS SAFETY, HELP THEM DEVELOP GOOD HABITS AND ENSURE THAT THEY HAVE FUN WHILE PARTICIPATING.

EDUCATION AND SAFETY TRAINING WILL DEFINITELY MAKE OUR ENVIRONMENT A SAFER PLACE.

BE RESPONSIBLE! THINK AND PLAY SAFELY.  

ON THE RANGE
I wii assume that you have had considerable practice and some coaching by a trained individual before you go to the range to shoot, if the range provides a coach and targets open for practise, this isn't necessary. You can learn the fundamentals of conduct that make for safety and pleasant relations with fellow shooters.
 
But I think it is far better to get your first lesson privately.Firing line commands and the racket of pistol at a range don't help a beginner to concentrate on his or her problems. He or she cannot shoot and at the same time look at and listen to what goes on around.
 
One of the first things to learn is a sort of subconcious concentration, hard to define. Disregard the annoying sounds of small talk, which has no place on the firing line, anyway. Shut your ears or plug them, to others firing, yet listen to the range officer's commands. Listen to what you should hear; skip the rest. 
 
Cultivate an even temperament and, never flare up at anything said by the range officer or other officials. it will ruin your score and mark you as one for all others to see and watch. If you break a rule, conciously or not and the officer bawls you out, remember that you had it coming, and resolve to avoid any such future infraction at all costs. Be honest with yourself, and right then and there, not sometime later.Success is for the sensible, and so is the pleasure associated with it.
 
Private instructions pays, for a not too gentle instructor who "calls" you for your faults and explains them, goes far in keeping you straight when you get to the range.
 
The officer there has no time to explain. He's buiser than any human being should be. His eyes must be everywhere at once, his voice ready to to snap like a whiplash to stop stop some thoughtless mug from leaving his or her gun loaded, pointing it at the next shooter, firing before the command, and so on. If the officer singles you out for some pointed remarks, why, they are impersonal. They have only to do with the conduct of his or her office.

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